THE DRUG TRADE IN THE DOMINION OF CANADA

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DRUG TRADE IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES

HOUSE DOCUMENT VOL. 49

55TH CONGRESS 1897-1898

 

 

DEPARTMENT CIRCULAR.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 25, 1898.

To the CONSULAR OFFICERS OF THE UNITED STATES.

  GENTLEMEN : The American Pharmaceutical Association of the United States* has requested this Department to aid the association in obtaining certain information in regard to the drug trade in foreign countries, and has submitted the following interrogatories to be propounded to the consular officers of the United States in the various countries of their residence:

  1. Is the drug business conducted independently or regulated as to extent and number of stores by the Government. If restricted by law attach a copy (translated) of the substance of the regulating law.

  2. State what are the differences between the prescription drug business and other drug establishments, if such exist. What are their relative numbers?

  3. Give detailed list of drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' sundries exported to other countries, especially to the United States, stating value, as far as practicable, in dollars and cents.

  4. Give list of drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' sundries imported from the United States. State whether any American medical preparations are imitated in your country of residences and if so, what goods and to what extent? Are there any laws prohibiting such imitation?

   5. State what, if any, drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, druggists' sundries, etc., are sold in department stores or other stores not drug stores, and to what extent, and whether in such stores the printed or usual retail prices are required or undersold at retail.

   6. What is the law and practice in regard to the final disposition of physicians' prescriptions when once filled by the druggists I Are they kept on file, and for how long?

   7. What is the law governing the renewal of prescriptions? Are druggists permitted to give copies, and under what conditions and circumstances?

  8. What is the law regulating the practice of pharmacy? Are persons holding diplomas from American colleges of pharmacy recognized as pharmacists and allowed to practice their profession?

* Through Mr. Joseph Jacobs, chairman of the commercial section.

 

  In replying to this circular, you are not to regard yourself as limited in your answers to the questions herein propounded, but will give any additional information, which, in your opinion, will be pertinent and valuable.

  It is desirable that your report should be made at as early a day as practicable, in order that it may be published in the Consular Reports before the next meeting of the American Pharmaceutical Association.

Respectfully, yours,

THOS. W. CRIDLER,

Third Assistant Secretary.

 

 

 

AMERICA.

. DOMINION OF CANADA.

I am unable to secure statistics relative to the exports and imports of drugs, chemicals, dyes, and medicines from and into the province of Quebec, and therefore send the statistics thereof for the Dominion as taken from the official publication showing the trade for the fiscal year and showing the imports and exports of drugs, chemicals, dyes, medicines, etc., into the Dominion of Canada daring the fiscal year 1897.

IMPORTS.

 

JOEL LINSLEY, Consul.

Coaticook, April 8, 1898

 

BRITISH COLUMBIA.

1. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

The drug business is conducted on Vancouvers Island and through out British Columbia independently, same as in the United States, and the number of stores is not restricted by law.

2. DRUGGIST v. PHARMACIST.

All the drug stores prepare all prescriptions desired by their customers.

 

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  The drugs imported from the United States to this island during the last six months of 1897 were as follows:

 

  Two-thirds of the druggists' articles sold in the island are of American manufacture. The list of proprietary medicines sold embraces the best known American brands, and there appears little difference in the stock in trade of a chemist in Victoria and that of a druggist in the States. Prices are high, the same as is nearly everything else that is sold on the coast. Small toilet articles manufactured in the States are sold here at retail 50 per cent higher than in the Central and Eastern States. Drug stores are quite numerous in proportion to the population and seem to be profitable.

  I do not know of any American medical preparation that is imitated in this province. There is no law particularly relating thereto except that providing for special care in all drugs.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  Drugs are not allowed to be sold in department or other stores not devoted to the drug business.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

 

  Physician's prescriptions are regarded as the property of the patient for whom they were given, and copies are furnished them only at any time they desire. No one else is allowed to see them. Druggists are not expected to destroy physicians' prescriptions, but to carefully preserve them intact " forever."

  Druggists are permitted and expected to give renewals of prescriptions to patients whenever required, unless physicians give special orders to the contrary.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

  A prescription clerk is required to serve four years in drug store before he is allowed to compound prescriptions, must be proved of good character, and must pass a rigid examination before a board of pharmacy inspectors composed of physicians and registered pharmacists of experience. Diplomas from American colleges of pharmacy are not accepted or regarded; the applicant must serve four years in a Canadian drugstore, and then pass the examining board.

ABRAHAM E. SMITH, Consul.

VICTORIA, March 1, 1898.

 

NEW BRUNSWICK.

1. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

  In the city of St. John the drug business is conducted independently, while in some of the smaller towns the business is conducted in connection with other lines. There is no restriction by the Government as to the number and extent of drug stores.

 

 

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

There are no department stores in this city handling drugs.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

  Physicians' prescriptions when filled are numbered and placed permanently on file, anti the patron can have them refilled at any time.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

  All pharmacists, whether holding diplomas or not, are required to pass an examination before the Provincial Pharmaceutical Society (a copy of the by-laws of which is hereto attached). There is no discrimination against persons holding diplomas from American colleges of pharmacy, but they are required to pass an examination.

IRA B. MYERS, Consul.

 

HALIFAX, March 4, 1898.

  

2. DRUGGIST V. PHARMACIST.

g stores do a prescription business.

John there are thirty-six retail stores and one wholesale house.

 

PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF NEW BRUNSWICK.

 

 

  10. From and after the thirty-first day of October, A. D. 1884, it shall be unlawful for any person to sell, or attempt to sell, or have exposed for sale, or keep open shop for retailing, dispensing, or compounding any of the drugs or medicines named in the Schedule A to this act, or which may hereafter be added to such schedule by authority of the governor in council upon recommendation of the pharmaceutical council, or to assume or use the title chemist and druggist, or chemist, or druggist, or pharmacist, or pharmaceutist, or apothecary, or dispensing chemist or druggist in any part of this Province, unless such person shall be registered under this act, and unless such person shall have taken out a certificate under the provisions of the seventh section for the time during which he is selling or keeping open shop for retailing, dispensing, or compounding such drugs or medicines or assuming or using any such titles; provided that this section shall not apply to nor prevent the sale of any such articles by wholesale in marked packages, or of any of the articles commonly known as patent medicines (by wholesale or retail; and also provided that this act shall not prevent any physician or surgeon in this Province, regularly registered under the provisions of the medical act, dispensing or compounding drugs or medicines in his practice; and also provided that nothing in this act contained shall extend to or interfere with the privileges conferred upon legally qualified medical practitioners by act relating to the registration and qualifications of physicians and surgeons in this Province, or any acts in amendment thereof, and they may be registered as pharmaceutical chemists or druggists without undergoing examinations; nor shall anything in this act prevent physicians and surgeons supplying to their patients such medicines as they may require; and nothing in this act shall prevent any registered medical practitioner from engaging in and carrying on the business of an apothecary, chemist, or druggist without examination; but in other respects, as such chemist or druggist, he shall be subject to the provisions of this act). No person shall sell any poison named in the first part of Schedule A, either by wholesale or retail, unless the box, bottle, vessel, wrapper, or cover in which the poison is contained is distinctly labeled with the name of the article and the word "poison," and if sold by retail, then also with the name and address of the proprietor of the establishment in which such poison is sold; and no person shall sell any poison mentioned in the first part of Schedule A to any person unknown to the seller unless introduced by some person known to the seller; and on every sale of such article the person selling the same shall, before delivery, make an entry in a book to be kept for that purpose in the form set forth in Schedule B to this act, stating the date of the sale, the name and address of the purchaser, the name and quantity of the article sold, and the purpose for which it is stated by the purchaser to be required; provided, however, that nothing contained in this section shall apply to the compounding or dispensing of physicians' or veterinary surgeons' prescriptions containing any of the poisons mentioned in the said Schedule A.

  11. The pharmaceutical council, with the concurrence of the president of the council of physicians and surgeons of New Brunswick, may from time to time, by resolution, declare that any poisonous or dangerous drugs or medicines mentioned in such resolutions ought to be added to the Schedule A of this act, and may recommend that such articles be added to such schedule accordingly; and such recommendation shall go into force and effect when and so soon as it shall have been approved by the governor in council and published in the Royal Gazette for the space of one month.

  12. Any person transgressing any of the provisions of the tenth section of this act shall, for the first offense, incur a penalty of twenty dollars and costs of prosecution, and for every subsequent offense shall incur a penalty of forty dollars and costs of prosecution, to be recovered in a summary manner, at the suit of the pharmaceutical or society before any stipendiary or police magistrate, or any parish court Toner, on the oath of one or more credible witness or witnesses, which penalty and costs, in default of payment, shall be enforced by execution as in the case of debt; and in default of sufficient distress the defendant shall be liable to imprisons the common gaol for a period of not more than twenty-five days unless such and costs be sooner paid. Every such penalty, when collected, shall be paid treasurer for the general uses of the society.

13. In any prosecution under this act it shall be incumbent upon the defendant to e that he is entitled to sell or keep open shop for compounding and dispensing and medicines and to assume and use the title chemist and druggist, or other mentioned in the tenth section of this act; and the production of a certificate orting to be under the baud of the registrar of the society, showing that he is so entitled, shall be prima facie evidence that he is so entitled.

14. No person selling articles in violation of this act shall recover any charges in ct thereof in any court of law or equity.

15. No person shall conduct, manage, or keep open shop as specified in section ten this act, in the capacity of agent for other parties, except such agent be a member this society. No clerk, servant, or other employee not duly qualified under this act shall be allowed by his employer in any case to dispense or compound drugs or medicines except under the direct personal supervision of a chemist or druggist duly qualified under this act to dispense and compound drugs or medicines. Any employer as aforesaid violating the provisions of this section shall be liable to the penalties as set out in section twelve of this act.

16. Upon the decease of any person legally authorized and actually carrying on the siness of chemist and druggist at the time of his death, it shall be lawful for the `+executor, administrator, or trustee of the estate of such person to continue such business if and so long only as such business is bona fide conducted by a pharmaceutical chemist' registered under this act.

17. Nothing in this act contained shall be taken to prevent the sale by persons not registered in pursuance of this act of paris green, London purple, and other insecticides, such as are used for agricultural or horticultural purposes in the destruction of insects.

Schedule A (poisons).

Acids: Carbolic, bydrocyanic, nitric, oxalic.

Aconite, and preparations thereof. Antimony, tartrate of.

Arsenic, and preparations thereof.         , Belladonna, and preparations thereof. Conium, and preparations thereof.

Chloral hydrate, cyanide of potash, and other cyanides. Chloroform.

Digitalis, and preparations thereof. Ergot, and preparations thereof. Ether.

Essential oils of bitter almonds, cedar, savin, rue, and tansy.

Goulard's extract of lead. Henbane, and preparations thereof. Indian hemp, and preparations thereof.

Mercury, all poisonous compounds thereof, including corrosive sublimate, red and

white precipitate.

Morphia and salts and preparations.

Nux vomica, and preparations thereof.

Opium, and preparations thereof, except paregoric.

Strychnia and salts and preparations.

Veratria, and all poisonous vegetable alkaloids and their salts.

 

ST. STEPHEN.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  There are no drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, or druggists' sundries exported from here to any country.

  The value of the importations at this port of drugs, chemicals, etc., from the United States for the seven months ending January 31, 1898, was $13,097; from Great Britain, $9,656, and from France, $390. No American medical preparations are imitated in this consular district. There is no law prohibiting such imitation except the patent law.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  All the dry and fancy goods stores sell perfumes and druggists' sundries. Most of the grocery stores have stocks of patent medicines, but there is no cut from the printed retail price.

 

CHARLES A. MCCULLOUGH, Consul.

 

ST. STEPHEN, February 26, 1898.

 

 

 

 

WOODSTOCK.

  The Government does not regulate the number of stores selling drugs, and all prescription stores sell proprietary articles, while other stores do not. Practically no goods in these lines are exported to the United States, and very few, if any, are brought here from the United States. American products are not imitated to any great extent, although there does not appear to be any law prohibiting such imitation, unless it maybe articles patented in Canada. Possibly one great reason may be that some of the larger American firms have branch manufactories in the Provinces. We do not have department stores, and generally full prices are asked. Prescriptions are kept on file for an indefinite time, with no particular governing law, and are seldom renewed unless the original owner asks, which sometimes occurs. No other copies are given. It is necessary for all. practicing pharmacists to be examined by the New Brunswick board, even if they hold American certificates.     -

FRANK C. DENISON, Consul.

Woodstock March 1, 1898

 

 

NEWFOUNDLAND.

1. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

The drug business is conducted independently of the Government.

2. DRUGGIST v. PHARMACIST.

There are no drug stores but those depending on physicians' prescription The number of drug stores in the colony of Newfoundland is comprising 12 retail and 13 wholesale and retail.

 

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

There. are no drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, etc., exported to other countries, as there are no chemical laboratories for such purpose. cod-liver oil is exported for medicinal and other use. The amount exported to the United States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, was 9,349 gallons; value, $4,207.

Drugs, chemicals, and proprietary articles imported from the United States were $10,343; druggists' sundries, $353. There was very little of the above in crude drugs. Most of the drugs and chemicals are imported from Europe.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

Drugs and chemicals are not sold in department store, but proprietary medicines 'are sold at all grocery stores. In most cases the regular retail prices are obtained. A few stores sell under the retail price, but do not interfere materially with druggists.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

  There is no law bearing on the final disposition of prescriptions. As a rule the druggist retains the prescription, but will give a copy if asked for. Prescriptions are filed and usually kept for two years.

  Physicians' prescriptions are repeated whenever required, at the discretion of the druggist. It is an unwritten law between prescriber and dispenser that prescriptions containing very active or poisonous substances will not be repeated.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

  There is no law here regulating the practice of pharmacy. Any student serving a five-year course with a reputable druggist is allowed to practice. There is nothing to debar persons holding American diplomas from practicing their profession.

 Druggist here have been handicapped in the past by the large stocks which they were compelled to carry, owing to their isolated position, but the railway across the island, nearly completed, will bring them into close proximity to Canada and the United States.

MARTIN J. CARTER, Consul,

ST. Johns, March 3, 1898,

 

NOVA SCOTIA.

L. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

  The drug business in Nova Scotia is conducted independently, and is not regulated by the government, except that the retail druggist must have a license as a compounder.

There are no stores which are distinctively prescription stores.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  The customs returns show only $12 value of drugs and chemicals exported from the port of Halifax to the United States during the past eight months.

  Nearly all proprietary articles have trade-marks registered in Canada, and it is not believed that American medical preparations are imitated in Nova Scotia to any extent.

  Acids, such as acetic, muriatic, nitric, sulphuric, oxalic, and mixed acids; glue, sheet and liquid; gums; licorice, paste and stick; proprietary medicines, vaseline, antimony, crude vanilla, brimstone, burgundy pitch, chloride of lime, extract of logwood, also logwood and fustic, dyeing articles, manganese, Iceland moss, quinine, soda, copperas, sulphate of copper, and turmeric include the chief drugs and chemicals imported at the port of Halifax from the United States.

5, SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  There are no regular department stores here. Drugs are sold only in drug stores.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

  Physicians' prescriptions become the property of the druggist who has filled them.

  The practice is to keep the prescriptions on file for an indefinite period.

  No restrictions are placed upon druggists as to renewing or giving copies of prescriptions.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

     license must be obtained from a provincial board, who must be satisfied of the competency of the applicant before anyone is permitted to practice pharmacy in Nova Scotia.

JOHN G. FOSTER,

Consul- General.

-

HALIFAX, March 4, 1898.

 

YARMOUTH.

  Only a small percentage of the goods used come from the United States, although the greater part of the proprietary articles and perfumes sold here are known as American goods. This is explained by t that a large number of manufacturers of standard articles in ine have branch factories in the Dominion of Canada, and from supply the Canadian trade. I am not aware of any imitation of ican medical preparations.

thing in the drug line is sold other than in drug stores, except it limited quantity of perfumery in dry goods stores.

RADCLIFFE H. FORD, Consul.

 

YARMOUTIl, 1llarch 7, 1898.

 

 

 

ONTARIO.

1. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

In Ontario the retail drug business can only be carried on by graduates or licentiates of the Ontario College of Pharmacy. There is no limit to the number of stores. (See Ontario pharmacy act attached rewith. )

2. DRUGGIST A% PHARMACIST.

Only retail druggists are allowed to dispense prescriptions. Wholesale druggists are not permitted to do so. Proprietors or managers of wholesale drug businesses are not required to be graduates of pharmacy.

Physicians may dispense their own prescriptions. Druggists are not allowed to prescribe.

 The relative numbers in the retail and wholesale drug business are about 50 to 1 in Ontario.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

 Druggists generally try to keep the physician's autograph prescription, and if customers demand a copy it is given. Should customers demand the autograph prescription returned to them, it is usual to give it, unless the physician particularly gives the dispenser contrary directions. It is frequently a vexing question, with no law to govern at present. Prescriptions are saved on file for au indefinite time.

  Prescriptions are always renewed at request of person originally presenting them, unless dispenser is otherwise instructed by prescriber. Druggists may give copies under same conditions.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

 A person practicing pharmacy must be a graduate of Ontario College of Pharmacy or have been in the retail drug business in Ontario as owner or manager prior to the passing of the pharmacy act, or be a regularly qualified medical practitioner of Ontario. No other pharmacy diplomas are recognized. It must be an Ontario College diploma.

 

Some other standards are acknowledged to be higher than that of the Ontario College, but the holders of these must pass the council examination of this college if they wish to register in Ontario.

M. J. BURKE, Consul.

PORT STANLEY AND ST. THOMAS, February 25, 1898.

ONTARIO PHARMACY ACT.

[From the Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1897 (just issued), April, 1898.]*

  3. The Ontario College of Pharmacy shall have power to acquire and hold real estate, not exceeding at any time in annual value $5,000, and may alienate, exchange, mortgage, lease, or otherwise charge or dispose of the said real estate or any part thereof as occasion may require, and may erect buildings for the purpose of accommodating lecturers on chemistry or pharmacy, or for a library, pharmaceutical museum, or specimen room for the use of the members and associates of the college; and all fees payable tinder this act shall belong to the college for the purposes of this act. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 3.

PHARMACEUTICAL COUNCIL.

  4. (1) There shall be a council of the college, to be called the pharmaceutical council, which shall consist of thirteen members, who shall be elected as hereinafter provided, and shall hold office fur two years, and the council shall, subject to the by-laws thereof, have sole control of the real and personal property of the college, and have authority to grant certificates of competency to conduct the business of a chemist or druggist, and to be registered subject to the provisions of this act. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 4.

  (2) The said thirteen members shall be selected from among those members of the college who are actively engaged on their own account, and as proprietors, in the occupation of pharmaceutical chemists, whether carrying on business as retail wholesale, or manufacturing chemists, and who reside in the Province of Ontario. 52 V., c. 25, s. 1, part.

  5. (1) The division of the Province into thirteen electoral territorial divisions for the purposes of this act heretofore made a by-law of the council shall continue until altered as hereinafter provided.

  (2) All general elections of the members of the council shall be held so that each member shall be a resident of, and shall be elected by, the duly qualified members of the college resident in the territorial division. The manner of holding such an election shall, with respect to the time thereof and the taking of the votes therefore, and the giving of a casting vote in case of equality of votes, be determined by bylaws of the council, and in default of such by-laws the lieutenant-governor in council may prescribe the time and manner of holding such election.

  (3) The council shall have power to rearrange the geographical boundaries of the electoral territorial divisions every ten years by a by-law assented to by the lieutenant-governor in council. 52 V., c. 25, s. l, part. See Ontario Gazette, 27th September, 1890.

  6. A member of the council may at any time resign by letter directed to the registrar of the college; and in the event of a vacancy occurring the remaining members of the council shall fill tip such vacancy from the members of the college; and such vacancy shall be filled front among members of the college resident in the territorial division represented by the member whose seat has become vacant. R. S. 0. 1887, c.151, s. 5; 52 V., c.25, s. 2.

 

7 An election of members of the council shall be held on the first Wednesday in July every second year, and the persons qualified to vote at the election shall be such persons as are members of the said college and are liable to pay the annual fee under this act. R. S. 0.1887, c. 151, s. 6; 52 V., c. 25, s.

8.  The council shall, at their first meeting, elect from among themselves a president and vice-president, and shall appoint a registrar and such other officers as the oil may consider necessary. R. S. O., 1887, c.151, s. 7.

CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY.

 

9. The council shall hold at least two sittings in every year, on the first Tuesday in  February and the first Tuesday in August, for the purpose of granting certificates of competency, at such places as they may by resolution appoint, of which due notice shall be given for at least one mouth in the Ontario Gazette and in at least two newspapers published in the city of Toronto. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 8; 52 V., 8.4.

 10 The council of the said college shall, subject to the supervision and disallowance thereof by the lieutenant-governor in council, have authority from time to time to prescribe the subjects upon which candidates for certificates of competency

shall be examined, and to prescribe a curriculum of studies to be pursued by the students; to establish a scale of fees, not to exceed $10, to be paid by persons applying for examination, and to make by-laws, rules, and orders for the regulation of its own meetings and proceedings and those of the college and for the remuneration and appointment of examiners and officers of the college, and for defining the duties of such examiners and officers, and for the payment of remuneration or indemnity to the members of the council in attending its sittings, or in attending upon the business of the college, and in respect to any other matters which may be requisite for the carrying out of this act.

 (2) No more than five cents per mile for traveling expenses, or more than $4 per day for such days only as any member is in actual attendance upon the business of the college, including going to and returning from such sitting, shall be allowed to bim for such expenses and remuneration. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 9; 52 V., c. 25, s. 5 au.] s. 6 (1), part.

  11. The examinations of the college may be conducted by the members of the council or by persons appointed by them. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 10.

WHO MAY APPLY FOR CERTIFICATES.

  12. (1) Subject to the rules, regulations, and by-laws of the Ontario College of Pharmacy, the following persons and no others may be admitted as candidates for certificates of competency:

  (a) Any person who was registered as an apprentice prior to the 23rd day of March, 1889, and who shall furnish to the council of the college satisfactory evidence of having, in pursuance of a binding contract in writing for that purpose, served as an apprentice to a regularly qualified pharmaceutical chemist for a term of not less than three years;

  (b) Any person who was registered as an apprentice on or after the said 23rd day of March, 1889, and who shall furnish to the council of the college satisfactory evidence of having served as an apprentice as aforesaid for a term of not less than four years and who has attended two courses of lectures, the first in any college of pharmacy or school of medicine approved by the council, and the second or senior course at the Ontario College of Pharmacy (such courses to comprise the following subjects, namely, pharmacy, chemistry, materia medica, botany, and reading and dispensing prescriptions), and who shall have attained the age of twenty-one years. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s.11 (a) ; 52 V. c. 25, s. 6 (1, 2).

   (2) The period occupied in attending the first of the said two courses of lectures may be counted as part of the term of apprenticeship. 52 V. e. 25, s. 6 (3).

 

  (3) In case any person who has apprenticed himself as aforesaid shall, by reason of the death, failure in business, or removal of his employer, or from any other cause satisfactory to the council, be unable to complete his term of apprenticeship with such employer, such person shall be at liberty, when and as often as this, may happen, to enter into a new contract to complete the remainder of his unfulfilled term with any other regularly qualified pharmaceutical chemist.

   (4) Nothing in this section shall apply to any person who had, prior to the 25th day of March, 1884, begun his apprenticeship with a regularly qualified pharmaceutical chemist without such binding contract in writing. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 11 (b, e).

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS.

   13. (1) Every person who may hereafter be desirous of becoming apprenticed as aforesaid shall, before the term of his apprenticeship begins to ran for the purpose, of this act, furnish to the registrar of the college a certificate or other evidence satisfactory to the council, showing that prior to the commencement of his apprenticeship he had passed an examination in the following subjects:

  Arithmetic and mensuration-Reduction; simple and compound proportion; vulgar and decimal fractions; square root; areas of rectilineal figures; volumes of right parallelopipeds.

  Algebra-Elementary rules; greatest common measure; least common multiple; fractions; simple equations of one unknown quantity.

Political, physical, and mathematical geography.

English grammar and composition. R. S. 0.1887, c. 151, s. 12; 52 V. c. 25, s. 7, part.

  (2) This section shall not apply to matriculants in arts or medicine in any British or colonial university or college, or to holders of second or third class nonprofessional certificates issued by the education department of Ontario, or to persons who produce evidence of having passed an examination at least equal to that of the latter. 52 V. c. 25, s. 7, part.

REGISTRATION.

  14. It shall be the duty of the registrar to make and keep a correct register, in accordance with the provisions of this act as shown in Schedule B, of all persons who may be entitled to be registered under this act, and to enter opposite the names of all registered persons who have died, a statement of such fact, and from time to time to make the necessary alterations in the addresses of persons registered under this act, and to cause to be printed and published, on or before the fifteenth day of June of each year, an alphabetical list of the members who were on the first day of June of that year entitled to keep open shop as pharmaceutical chemists. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s.13.

  15. Any person having passed such examination as aforesaid to the satisfaction of the council shall be entered upon the roll of registered chemists and druggists, and shall become a member of the college. R. S. 0. 1887, c.151, s. 14.

  16. All persons approved of by the council of the college, who hold diplomas from the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, or certificates from any pharmaceutical college in the Dominion of Canada or elsewhere, may be registered as members of the Ontario College of Pharmacy without the examination prescribed by this act. R.. S. 0.1887, c. 151, s. 15.

  17. No name shall be entered in the register except of persons authorized by this act to be registered, nor unless the registrar is satisfied by proper evidence that the person claiming is entitled to be registered; and any appeal from the decision of the registrar may be decided by the council of the college; and any entry proved to the satisfaction of the council to have been. Fraudulently or incorrectly made may be erased from or amended in the register by order of the council. R. S. 0. 1887, e. 151's.16.

  18. 1'pon any person being registered under this act, he shall be entitled to receive a certificate in the form of Schedule 1 or to the like effect, under the corporate seal of the college, and signed by the registrar. R. S. 0. 1887, e. 151, s. 17.

  19 There shall be payable to the registrar of the college, for the uses of the Colon the first day of May of each year, by every person registered and carrying siness as a pharmaceutical chemist, the sum of $4; provided, that in case such n shall carry on business in more than one locality the further sum of $4 shall fable by hint, as aforesaid, for each additional place of business, and provided that all employees or assistants who manage or have charge of such additional s of business shall be legally qualified pharmaceutical chemists. R. S. 0. 1887, l, s.18.

  20 Any person registered under this act, and no other person, shall be entitled to called a pharmaceutical chemist, and no person except a pharmaceutical chemist, '-aforesaid, or his employee or employees, shall be authorized to compound prescriptions of legally authorized medical practitioners; but no person shall be titled to any of the privileges of a pharmaceutical chemist or member of the liege who is in default in respect to any fees payable by him by virtue of this t. R. S. 0. 1887, c.151, s. 19.

21. Upon a resolution of the council of the college being passed, declaring that y person in consequence of his conviction for any offence or offences against this t, is, in the opinion of the council, unfit to be on the register under this act, the entenaut-governor in council may direct that the name of such person shall be erased from the register, and it shall be the duty of the registrar to erase the same

accordingly. R. S. 0. 1887, c.151, s.20.

   22. Every pharmaceutical. chemist carrying on business on his own account shall display his certificate in a conspicuous position in his place of business. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 21.

   23. Every person having been registered, under this act or any former act, as a pharmaceutical chemist shall, on retiring from business as a chemist, give the registrar notice in writing of the same, and his name shall be erased from the register of pharmaceutical chemists and he shall cease to enjoy any of the privileges of the college, and in default of such notice he shall remain liable for his annual registration fee; provided that it shall be lawful for any such person to resume the business of chemist and druggist at any time after retiring therefrom as aforesaid, upon giving notice in writing to the registrar of the college of his intention so to do and upon payment to him of the then current annual registration fee. R. S. 0. 1887, c.151, s. 22; 52 V. c.25, s. 8.

   24. Upon the decease of any person legally authorized and actually carrying on the business of chemist and druggist at the time of his death, it shall be lawful for the executor, administrator, or trustee of the estate of such person to continue the business if and so long only as such business is bona fide conducted by a pharmaceutical chemist registered under this act, provided such executor, administrator, or trustee continues to pay the annual registration fee of $4. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s.32.

PREPARATION OP COMPOUNDS.

  25. All compounds named in the British Pharmacopoeia shall be prepared according to the formula directed in the latest edition published "by authority" unless the College of Physicians and Surgeons of this province select another standard, or unless the label distinctly shows that the compound is prepared according to another formula. R. S. 0.1887, c.151, s. 23.

SALT OP POISONS.

  26. No person shall sell or keep open shop for retailing, dispensing, or compounding poisons, or sell or attempt to sell any of the articles mentioned in Schedule A to this act, or assume or use the title of "chemist and druggist," or "chemist," or "druggist," or "pharmacist," or "apothecary," or "dispensing chemist," or "dispensing druggist," in any putt of the Province of Ontario, unless such person is registered under this act, and milers such person has taken out a certificate under the provisions of section 1S of this act, for the time during which he is selling or keeping open shop for retailing, dispensing, or compounding poisons, or assuming or using such title; provided, that nothing in this act contained shall be taken to prevent the sale, by persons not registered in pursuance of this act, of paris green and London purple, so long as such articles are sold in well-secured packages, distinctly labeled with the name and address of the person preparing or putting tip such packages and marked "Poison." R. S. 0.1887, c.151, s. 24; 56 V. c. 28, s.1.

  27. The several articles named or described in Schedule A shall be deemed to be poisons within the meaning of this act, and the council of the Ontario College of Pharmacy, hereinbefore mentioned, may from time to time by resolution declare that any article in the resolution named ought to be deemed a poison within the meaning of this act, and thereupon the said council shall submit the same for the approval of the lieutenant-governor in council, and if approval is given, then such resolution and approval shall be advertised in the Ontario Gazette, and on the expiration of one month from the advertisement the article named in the resolution shall be deemed to be a poison within the meaning of this act, and the same shall be subject to the provisions of this act, or such of them as may be directed by the lieutenant-governor in council. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 25.

  28. No person shall sell any poison named in the first part of Schedule A either by wholesale or retail, unless the box, bottle, vessel, wrapper, or cover in which the poison is contained is distinctly labeled with the name of the article and the word << Poison," and if sold by retail, then also with the name and address of the proprietor of the establishment in which such poison is sold; and no person shall sell any poison mentioned in the first part of Schedule A to any person unknown to the seller unless introduced by some person known to the seller; and oil every sale of any such article the person actually selling the same shall, before delivery, make an entry in a book to be kept for that purpose, in the form set forth in Schedule C to this act, stating the date of the sale, the name and address of the purchaser, the name and quantity of the article sold, the purpose for which i t is stated by the purchaser to be required, and the name of the person, if any, who introduced him, to which entry the signature of the purchaser shall be affixed. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 26.

OFFENCES AND PENALTIES.

  29. No person shall willfully or knowingly sell any article tinder the pretence that it is a particular drug or medicine which it is not in fact, and any person so doing (besides any other penalties to which he may be liable) shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by section 30 of this act. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 27.

  30. Any person transgressing any of the provisions of this act, or selling any poison in violation thereof, shall for the first offence incur a penalty of $20 and costs of prosecution, and for each offence committed subsequent to such conviction a penalty of $50 and costs of prosecution, to be recovered in a summary manner before one or more justices of the peace or a police magistrate, under the Ontario summary convictions act, on the oath of one or more credible witnesses, one moiety to belong to the prosecutor and the other to be paid to the registrar for the use of the college. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s.28.

  31. In any prosecution tinder this act it shall be incumbent upon the defendant to prove that he is entitled to sell or keep open shop for compounding medicines or retailing poisons, and to assume the title of chemist and druggist, or other title mentioned in section 26 of this act, and to give evidence sufficient prima facie to )rove that no unregistered person who personally takes any part whatever in selling or dispensing drugs or medicines is interested with him in his sales as chemist and druggist, and the production of a certificate purporting to be under the hand of the registrar and under the seal of the college, skewing that any person named therein is entitled as aforesaid, shall be prima facie evidence that such person is so entitled.

S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 29; 52 V., c. 25, s. 9.

 32. No person selling articles in violation oft)e provisions of this act shall recover any charges in respect thereof in any court of justice. R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s.30.

 

ACT NOT TO AFFECT MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS.

Nothing in this act contained shall extend to or interfere with the privileges ed upon legally qualified medical practitioners by the Ontario medical act, ed that where such medical practitioner desires to carry on the business of a pharmaceutical chemist, as defined by this act, be shall not be required to pass the

examination prescribed by the College of Pharmacy, but he shall register as a pharmaceutical chemist and comply with all other requirements of this act, and nothing in this act contained shall prevent any person whatsoever from selling goods y kind to any person legally authorized to carry on the business of an apothecary, chemist, or druggist, or the profession of a doctor of medicine, physician or surgeon, or veterinary surgeon, or shall prevent the members of such professions supplying their patients such medicine as they may require, or shall interfere with the business of wholesale dealers in supplying poisons or other articles in the ordinary course of wholesale dealing. (R. S. 0. 1887, c. 151, s. 31 (1); 52 V., c. 25, x.10 (1).) 4. (1) Nothing in this act contained shall extend to or interfere with or affect the king or dealing in any patent or proprietary medicines, except as is in this section vided.

2) If there is reason to apprehend that any such medicine contains any poison mentioned in the schedules to this act in such quantity as renders the use of the id medicine in the doses prescribed dangerous to health or life, the Provincial and of health may cause an analysis of such medicine to be made by an analyst other competent person appointed by the lieutenant-governor in council.

(3) If on such analysis it is reported by such analyst or other person that such patent or proprietary medicine does contain any of the said poisons in such a quantity renders its use in the closes prescribed dangerous to health or life, the said board ay give notice to the manufacturer or proprietor of such patent or proprietary medicine, or to his agent or representative in this Province, of the result of such

analysis, and in that case shall name a convenient time and place at which the manufacturer or proprietor may be heard before the said board in opposition to the said report.

  (4) If the board is of the opinion that the said patent or proprietary medicine is in the doses prescribed dangerous as aforesaid, the board shall afterwards report their opinion to the lieutenant-governor in council, and the report shall be subject to appeal to the lieutenant-governor in council.

  (5) The board shall submit to the lieutenant-governor in council the report of the analysis and the objections, if any, made to the same by the manufacturer or proprietor, together with the report of the board thereon, and if the lieutenant-governor in council approves of the report of the board notice thereof may be given in the Ontario Gazette, and after such notice in the Ontario Gazette the provisions of this act with regard to poisons shall apply to such patent or proprietary medicines, whether sold by persons registered in pursuance of this act or by others. 58 V., c. 29,s. 2.

 

HONORARY MEMBERS.

  35. It shall be competent for the council of the college to elect as honorary members such persons as may be eminent for their scientific attainments, but such honorary members shall not as such be entitled to vote at elections or carry on the business of pharmaceutical chemists. R. S. 0.1887, c. 151, s. 33.

DIVISION ASSOCIATIONS.

  36. In each of the territorial electoral divisions referred to in section -5 there may be established a territorial division pharmaceutical association, which may be called the "Division Association" of such division, of which every member of the college residing in such division shall be a member, and the representative in the council shall be ex officio chairman of such division association. 52 V., c. 25, s. 12.

INSERT 218

CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION.

I hereby certify that C. D., having complied with the requirements of the pharmacy act, was on the (lay of , A. D. 18 , duly registered as a pharmaceutical chemist, and is authorized to carry on the business of chemist and druggist

the Province of Ontario from the           day of   18 , to the         day of   )18

R. F.

Registrar of the Ontario College of Pharmacy. 52 V. c. 25, s. 13. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY IN ONTARIO.

  No person shall sell or keep open shop for retailing, dispensing, or compounding poisons, or sell tiny of the articles mentioned hereinafter, or assume or use the title of "chemist druggist," or '4chemist," or "druggist," or" pharmacist," or "apothecary," or "dispensing chemist," in any part of the province of Ontario, unless such person is registered under this act, for the time during which he is selling or keeping open shop for dispensing or compounding poisons, or assuming or using such titles, provided that nothing in this act contained shall be taken to prevent the sale, by persons not registered in pursuance of this act, of paris green and other arsenical insecticides so long as such are sold in secure packages, distinctly labeled, with the name and address of the seller and marked "Poison," and a record of sales is kept.

  Nothing in the act contained shall apply to legally qualified medical practitioners.

Executors may carry on business of deceased chemist.

  Persons holding diplomas from American colleges are not allowed to practice their profession until they have passed the examinations prescribed by the council.

  No diploma is granted to any candidate who has not attained the age of 21.

 

 

FORT ERIE, February 25, 1898.

 

FORT ERIE.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  There are practically no drugs, chemicals, etc., exported from this district, especially to the United States. There are also none imported to this district from the United States. No imitations that I know of.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  Everything kept in a first-class drug store is now sold in departmental stores to a large extent, the goods in every case being undersold at prices at which small retailers can not buy from their wholesaler.

 

FORT ERIE, February 21, 1898.

 

GUELPH.

  The drug business in this district is conducted independently, and is not regulated as to extent or number of stores, but every druggist must a diploma as having qualified as such from the Ontario College of Pharmacy, in Toronto, Canada.

All retail drug stores are conducted as dispensing pharmacies, and are compelled to have a prescription department.

  Drugs, chemicals, etc., are not exported from this district to the United States or any other country, but mostly all of the drugs, chemicals proprietary articles, and druggists' supplies are imported from the United States.

  American medical preparations are not known to be imitated in this district.

What are generally known as "patent medicines" are protected by law from imitation, if formula and trade-mark are copyrighted with Canadian Government.

 Many of the departmental stores throughout Canada have a drug department, governed by the same law as an ordinary retail druggist.

GUELPH, March 1,0, 1898.

 

CHARLES N. DALY, Consul.

HAMILTON, March 10, 1898.

JAS. M. SHEPARD, Consul.

 

HAMILTON.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  There is practically no exportation of drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, or druggists' sundries from this port, excepting shipments of coal-tar derivatives of Swiss manufacture to the United States. The declared value of such derivatives exported from Hamilton during the year 1897 was $12,688.46.

  A very large percentage of crude drugs, roots, leaves, herbs, bark, chemical and pharmaceutical preparations, and proprietary articles used and sold here are imported from the United States, while heavy chemicals and druggists' sundries, excepting rubber goods, are brought from Europe. American glycerin is lately displacing European. A few American medical preparations are said to be imitated when unprotected by registration, but stringent laws provide for the protection of such goods when the trademark is registered.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  Very few drugs proper are sold outside of drug stores, but some department stores include complete drug stores, employing a qualified pharmacist as attendant, and generally proprietary articles, perfumes, sundries, etc., are sold in such stores, and the usual retail prices are undersold. It has been found impracticable to enforce the provisions of the pharmacy act against corporations, and amendments to that end are being considered.

 

 

 

LONDON.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  As shown by customs reports for this consular district, embracing a thickly populated country and the city of London with a population of 40,000, and the towns of Woodstock with 12,000, Ingersoll with 5,000, Strathroy with 5,000, and Exeter with 2,500,besides smaller towns and villages, the following is a detailed list. of drugs, chemicals, etc., imported from the United States for the quarter ended December 31, 1897:

  The amount of drugs, chemicals, etc., exported to the United States was so small that I only give the total for the same quarter, which was $203.

5. SALE, OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  In other than drug stores, perfumes and druggists' sundries are frequently offered for sale, and in regular department stores it is very common to find a general supply of drugs, proprietary articles, perfumes, etc., which generally are sold at less than the printed or usual retail prices.

LONDON, February 15, 1898.

PALMERSTON.

1. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

  The consular district of Palmerston is composed of a great number of shall towns, a few large ones, but no cities. The largest town in the district has a population not exceeding 3,100, and the thirty-two largest aggregate less than 40,000 people.

 

  The business in this section is usually conducted in conjunction with sale of stationery, newspapers and periodicals, blank books, school books and supplies, Sunday-school and church books, garden and other seeds, toys, and holiday goods in season, bicycles, etc.; the towns being too small to permit the business being made a specialty of. No distinction exists between prescription and other drug stores.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

-This district being essentially a distributing or retail community, there are no transactions whatever of an export nature within the scope of inquiry, either with the United States or elsewhere, and the same may be said of imports. Drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' supplies are purchased of Canadian wholesale merchants. Direct importations are few and unimportant. Druggists generally use all of the favorably known American preparations, which hey freely admit are the best obtainable. Among others, those manufactured by Messrs. John Wyeth & Co., Parke, Davis & Co., McKesson & Robbins, Frederick Stearns & Co., and II. K. Wampole, and all the usual best-known patent medicines are popular and in constant demand. No imitations of United States medical preparations are known here-druggists maintain that there are none such in the market and indications all point to the correctness of that contention.

  Laws prohibiting the imitation of medical preparations and prescribing penalties for so doing have been enacted in this province.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

  Country storekeepers usually have in stock limited quantities of such drugs as turpentine, laudanum, spirits of niter, ointments, liniments, a few pills, and a small line of proprietary medicines, but as a general thing there is little or no effort made to go beyond the simplest and cheapest provision for rural demand, and no attempt is made to cut under usual prices. The octopus known as the department store is not to be found in this immediate district at all, though its tentacles are considerably in evidence, to the continual disturbance of local business conditions.

LOTON S. HUNT, Consul.

PALMERSTON, April 8, 1898.

 

 

PORT HOPE.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  Very few articles of the nature of drugs are exported from Ontario ginseng, seneca root, and fir balsam being about all.

 Every medicinal preparation of any note that is prepared or put up in the United States can be found on sale in Canada, mostly imported, but in a few cases the owners have a branch establishment in this country. Perfumes, fancy soaps, and all kinds of rubber goods and sundries, such as are usually carried by druggists, are extensively imported from the United States. No counterfeit or imitation American medicinal preparations are known to be made. The laws prohibit their manufacture or sale.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

   In the larger cities department stores carry full lines of drugs, medicines, and medicinal preparations, on which the prices are heavily cut, and on many leading articles regular pharmacists are forced to meet them.

HARRY P. DILL, Commercial Agent.

PORT HOPE, March 29, 1898.

 

 

PORT STANLEY AND ST. THOMAS.

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

No exportations to any country from this district.

   American medical preparations are imported into Ontario. Any intended for legitimate use may be brought in by paying the Canadian customs tariff. There is no imitation of American preparations in this district.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES

   Department stores may and do handle all or any drugs, compounds, or preparations of a proprietary character. They must have a regular druggist in charge of drug-store department. Prices generally cut in department stores.

                                               AI. J. BURKE, Consul. PORT STANLEY and ST. THOMAS, February 25, 1898.

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND.

1. THE; DRUG BUSINESS.

There are no restrictions by law as regards the number of stores.

2. DRUGGIST v. PHARMACIST.

  All drug establishments have dispensary departments. No other establishment sells drugs.

 

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

No exports from this Province, such as drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' sundries.

No direct importation of drugs from the United States. The druggists of this Province purchase American prescriptions through Canadian wholesale houses. There are no American prescriptions imitated d offered for sale in the Province.

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

   Grocers sell a few articles, such as patent foods and meat prescriptions, at same price as druggists.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

   There is no law regarding the final disposition of physicians' prescriptions when once filled by the druggist. The custom is for the purchaser to leave the prescription, which is kept on file indefinitely, properly numbered. A copy is given if requested.

   Regarding the renewal of prescriptions, there is no law in this matter. It is customary to renew prescriptions when requested to do so.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

   There is no pharmaceutical law in this Province. Anyone may conduct a drug store who can satisfy public confidence.

DELMAR J. VAIL, Consul.

CHARLOTTETOWN, February 26, 1898.

QUEBEC.

   In response to inquiries respecting the drug business, contained in Department of State circular dispatch dated January 25, 1898, I submit below answers to the interrogatories which were kindly given to me by Mr. E. Muir, secretary-registrar of the Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of Quebec, Montreal, Canada, who is an admitted authority on the laws and regulations governing the practice of pharmacy in the Province of Quebec. I am also indebted to Mr. Muir for a copy of the Quebec pharmacy act which accompanies this report.

1. THE DRUG BUSINESS.

   The drug business is conducted independently, not being regulated by law as to the extent or number of stores. The Quebec pharmacy act regulated the retail drug trade, but has no power or control over the wholesale drug trade.

2. DRUGGIST v. PHARMACIST.

   There are about 275 drug stores in this Province. There are no purely prescription drug stores, but all deal in druggists' sundries, perfumery, toilet. articles, and proprietary medicines,

7076-15

 

3, 4. EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF DRUGS AND MEDICINES.

  So little information is given in the statistical table of imports and exports in reference to proprietary articles, patent medicines, etc., that I have prepared a list showing the variety of such articles sold in this Province, compiled from the list of a leading dealer. The prices are omitted from this list for obvious reasons.

LIST OF DRUGS, CHEMICALS, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES, PERFUMES, DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, ETC., ON SALE IN THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC.

 

COATICOOK, April 8, 1898.

 

 

 

 

 

5. SALE OF DRUGS IN LAY STORES.

   In the Province of Quebec the sale of drugs and proprietary medicines by department stores is as yet very limited-there being so far as can be ascertained only two department stores selling these goods; but the sale of perfumery and toilet articles is quite extensively carried on by departmental and dry goods stores. At present grocers and general country stores keep and sell proprietary medicines and a few of the common drugs, but by recent judgments the sale of these articles is unlawful and may be stopped.

6, 7. PRESCRIPTIONS.

   There is no law governing the disposition of physicians' prescriptions. These are usually either copied or pasted into a book and numbered, or, if not kept, are filed away each month, the druggists as a rule keeping the original prescription and furnishing a copy if required.

   There is no law governing the renewal of prescriptions. Druggists give copies and repeat prescriptions when requested.

8. PRACTICE OF PHARMACY.

   The Quebec pharmacy act (herewith inclosed) will suffice for information on the practice of pharmacy. The Province of Quebec has no reciprocal interchange of diplomas. Each application for registration to practice pharmacy is acted upon on its merits.

JOEL LINSLEY, Consul.

THE QUEBEC PHARMACY ACT, AS AMENDED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE

PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, APRIL 2, 1890.

SECTION IV.

SECTION 1.-Declaratory and interpretative provisions.

  4019. This section may be cited as the "Quebec Pharmacy Act," and the following words and expressions therein shall, unless such interpretation be repugnant to the subject, or inconsistent with the context, be construed as follows:

  (1) The word "council" means the Council of the Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of Quebec.

 

2) The word "members" means persons registered as licentiates of pharmacy in s Province.

(3) The words "certified clerks" mean persons who have passed the primary examination specified in this section, and have been duly registered as such. (4) The words "certified apprentices" mean persons who have passed the preliminary examination specified by this section, and have been duly registered as such. (5) The words "I board of examiners" mean a committee appointed by the council

to conduct the examinations specified by this section.

  (6) The word " registrar" means an officer appointed by the council to carry on the work of the association, under the provisions of this section.

  (7) The word "register" or "registers" means a list or lists, as the case may be, of persons registered under this section.

  (8 The word "drugs" means articles used medicinally, whether compounded or simple.

  (9) The word "poisons" means drugs or chemicals which are dangerous to human life.

  (10) The word "drug store" means a place where drugs and poisons are sold by retail, or compounded.

  (11) The words "druggist," "chemist," "apothecary," "pharmaceutist," "pharmacist," "pharmaceutical chemist," or "dispensing chemist, "mean a person having a right to sell and compound drugs and poisons in this Province.

  (12) The word "person" or "persons" means corporate bodies, as well as individuals and private associations. (48 V., C. 36, S.S. 1 and 2.)

SECTION 2.-Corporate powers of the association.

  4020. The corporation known as the " Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of Quebec," is continued, with all rights and privileges with which it is vested by the acts constituting it.

  The association continues to have perpetual succession, and a common seal, with power to alter, vary, break, or renew the same at discretion.

  By the same name it may sue and be sued, implead or be impleaded, answer and be answered unto in all courts in this Province, and may purchase, take, or hold real and personal property, provided the real property so held by the said corporation does not, at any time, exceed the value of twenty thousand dollars.

  It may hypothecate or alienate such property and acquire other property insteac thereof. (48 V., C. 36, S. 3.)

SECTION 3.-Council of the association.

   4021. The affairs of the association are conducted by a council, composed of twelve licentiates of pharmacy, resident in this Province, six of whom retire annually according to seniority.

The retiring members are, however, eligible for reelection. (48 V., C. 36, S. 4.) 4022. The Council of the association has power:

   (1) To frame such by-laws for the said association as they shall deem proper am necessary for the purposes contemplated by this law, to alter and amend such by-law from time to time, and to repeal the same in whole or in part, and substitute other therefore.

  (2) To elect at their first meeting, subsequent to the annual elections, from anion, their members, a president, two vice-presidents, a treasurer, and two auditors.

  (3) To elect persons to replace members of the council who die, resign, or are removed, and also persons to replace the auditors, when vacancies occur for the same reasons.

Such persons must be chosen from among the members of the corporation.

  (4) To elect as honorary, and corresponding members of the association such persons as may be eminent for scientific attainments.

 

  Such honorary members shall not, as such, be entitled to vote at elections or to rank as licentiates of pharmacy.

  (5) To appoint a secretary-registrar, who shall hold office until removed for reasons considered valid by the majority of the council.

 4022a. The council of the association shall appoint a permanent board of trustees, not less than six and not exceeding ten in number, who shall control and manage the real and personal property of the corporation, subject to the by-laws thereof. Such trustees shall give to the council an annual statement.

  They shall not buy, sell, or mortgage any property of the corporation without the concurrence of the council, who shall call a general meeting of the members of the corporation.

  A two-thirds vote of the members present shall be required before any property can be purchased, mortgaged, exchanged, or sold.

 4023. The annual general meeting of the association shall be held alternately in the cities of Montreal and Quebec, on the second Tuesday in the month of June in each year, or on such other day near thereto as shall be determined upon by the council.

SECTION 4.-Licensed chemists.

4024. In pharmacy there are three classes of persons:

I. Certified apprentices;

II. Certified clerks; and -

III. Licentiates of pharmacy.

  1. To be admitted as a "certified apprentice" the candidate must produce satisfactory evidence of a good moral character, pass a preliminary examination in the English, French, and Latin languages, in arithmetic, geography, and history, and pay the fees prescribed by article 4029 of this act. Every student of medicine duly registered as such is considered as a "certified apprentice."

  2. To be admitted as a "certified clerk" the candidate must produce evidence of three years' registration as a "certified apprentice," prove that he has served at least three years with a physician or a licentiate of pharmacy duly registered, pass an examination in the translation and dispensing of prescriptions, in pharmacy, chemistry, toxicology, posology, and materia medica, and pay the fees prescribed in

article 4029.

  3. To be admitted as "licentiate of pharmacy" the candidate must be a "certified clerk," prove that he has followed two courses in chemistry, two courses in materia medica, and a course in botany; that he has served during four years under a licentiate of pharmacy duly enregistered, and pay the fees prescribed in article 4029.

  The "major examination," which the candidate who presents himself to be a licentiate of pharmacy must pass, includes the same subjects as the "minor examination," but a more extended knowledge of toxicology, materia medica, and pharmaceutical chemistry, as well as a knowledge of botany, are required.

  4025. All the examinations referred to in the previous articles-viz, the preliminary examination, primary examination, and final -examination-take place before the board of examiners and are regulated by such rules and by-laws as may be in force at the time such examinations are held; and all candidates for any of the said examinations shall pay the fees imposed by the said rules or by-laws. 48 V., c. 36, s. 10.

SECTION 5.-Board of examiners.

  4026. The board of examiners shall be appointed by the council at its first meeting after the annual meeting, and shall be composed of persons it deems competent.

  These persons shall examine the candidates and grant such certificates or diplomas as they may think proper to those whom they deem qualified to be "licentiates of pharmacy," "certified clerks," or "certified apprentices."

  The major and minor examinations of candidates shall be held in Montreal in the spring and in Quebec in the fall of each year.

 

7. The board of examiners may dispense with the examinations provided for in

F

les 4024 and 4025, and may accept in lieu thereof authenticated certificates of   by duly appointed medical or pharmaceutical boards whose curriculum technical and practical education is equivalent to that required by the said arti4024 and 4025, subject to the decision and approbation of the council. Such certificates must be accompanied by certificates of good moral character, and shall be subject to such other regulations as may be imposed by by-law. 48 V., C 36, s. 12.

SECTION 6.-Secretary and registrar.

4028. The duties of the secretary and registrar are:

(1) To act as secretary at all meetings of the association and council. (2) From time to time make out and maintain "registers" of First. Licentiates of pharmacy;

Second. Certified clerks; and

Third. Certified apprentices.

  He shall grant, on application, certificates of such registration, on payment of such fee as may be fixed by by-law.

  (3) To make new "registers" for each year and omit therefrom the names of persons deceased or transferred from one "register" to another, or of persons not having paid their fees, provided their names are submitted to the council, and provided the secretary-registrar has received instructions from the council to erase said names.

  (4) In the absence of the secretary-registrar from any meeting it shall be competent for the presiding officer to appoint some person to act as secretary for the time being.

SECTION 7.-Duties of licentiates.

  4029. Persons registered under this act shall pay the following fees to the registrar, namely

Every licentiate of pharmacy, an annual fee not exceeding ten dollars;

(2) Every certified clerk, an annual fee not exceeding five dollars; and

(3) Every certified apprentice, an annual fee not exceeding two dollars.

  Such fees shall be due on the first day of May in every year. Any licentiate, certified clerk, or certified apprentice not paying such fee before the first day of June in each and every year may be removed from the registrar; and when so removed from the register shall lose all the privileges hereby conferred upon him. He may, however, be restored to all his former privileges on payment of a fine of five dollars for a licentiate, two dollars for a certified clerk, and one dollar for a certified apprentice, providing such fine, together with the annual fee, be paid on or before the first day of October following.

  4030. Persons registered under this act shall, on retiring from business, give the registrar notice in writing of the same, and in default thereof they shall remain liable for theit annual fee; but it shall be lawful for any such person to be reentered on the register ai any time after retiring therefrom as aforesaid, upon giving notice in writing to the said registrar of his intention so to register, and upon payment to him of all arrears, together with the fee for the current year. 48 V., c. 36, s. 15.

 

  4030a. Any person registered under this law who, on retiring from business, shall have given notice to the registrar in writing of the same, may at any time thereafter be reentered on the register as aforesaid upon giving notice in writing to the said registrar of his intention so to reregister and upon the payment to the said registrar of the then current annual fee.

  4031: All persons openly keeping drug stores in this Province having licentiates of pharmacy, clerks, or apprentices in their employ shall furnish the registrar with a list of such employees prior to the first day of May in each year. 48 V., c. 36, s. 16.

  4032. Upon the decease of any person legally authorized and actually carrying on the business of chemist and druggist at the time of his death, it shall be lawful for the executor, administrator, or trustee of the estate of such person to continue such

 

business, if and so long only as such business is conducted under the personal superintendence of a licentiate of pharmacy, registered under this section, provided such executor, administrator, or trustee continue to pay the annual registration fee heretofore paid by the said deceased licentiate.

  (2) These provisions shall also apply to the estate of any licentiate of pharmacy who may have become mentally or physically incapacitated from carrying on the business of a chemist and druggist. 48 V., c. 36, s. 17.

  (3) In case of an insolvent, the party to whom an assignment is made, should the business be kept open, must place in charge a registered physician or licentiate of pharmacy until such estate is closed.

SECTION 8.-Sale of drugs and poisons.

  4033. The several articles named or described in Schedule A of this law shall be poisons within the meaning thereof.

  The council may from time to time by by-law declare that any article named in such by-law shall be deemed a poison within the meaning of this law, and it shall then be added to and become part of Schedule A.

  Such addition shall be advertised in the Quebec Official Gazette, after which it shall become law, and a notice of such declaration shall be sent by registered letter to every licentiate of pharmacy and duly registered physician.

  4034. It shall be unlawful to keep or sell any of the poisons named in Schedule A unless the box, bottle, vessel, wrapper, or cover in which such poison is contained be distinctly labeled with the name of the article and the word "POISON," and with the name and address of the seller of the poison.

  It shall be unlawful to sell any such poison to any person unknown to the seller, unless introduced by some person known to seller.

  On every sale of such poison the seller shall, before delivery, make or cause to be made an entry in a book to be kept for that purpose, stating, in the form set forth in Schedule B, the date of the sale, the name and address of the purchaser, the name and quantity of the poison sold, and the purpose for which it is stated by the purchaser to be required.

  The signature of the purchaser and of the person (if any) who introduced the purchaser, shall be affixed to such entry.

  The book specified in the present article for the purposes aforesaid shall be called the " Poison Sales' Register," and shall be open to inspection by the registrar at any time.

  Nothing contained in the present article shall apply to the compounding or dispensing of physicians' or veterinary surgeons' prescriptions, containing any of the poisons mentioned in the said Schedule A.

  4035. No person shall keep open a shop for the retailing, dispensing or compounding of drugs or of the poisons enumerated in Schedule A annexed to this section ; or sell or attempt to sell any drug, or any of the poisons enumerated in the said schedule, or any medicinal preparation containing any of the said poisons; or engage in the dispensing of prescriptions, or use or assume the title of chemist and druggist, or chemist, or druggist, or apothecary, or pharmacist, or pharmacentist, or dispensing or pharmaceutical chemist, or any other title bearing a similar interpretation within this Province, unless he be a physician inscribed as a member of the college of physicians and surgeons of this province or be registered in accordance with the provisions of this section as a "licentiate of pharmacy." 48 V., c.36, s. 20.

  4035a. Physicians duly enregistered as members of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of the Province of Quebec, shall have the right to open a drug store, provided they pay the fee required by article 4029 without any prejudice to their privileges as physicians.

  4035b. Notwithstanding the provisions of the previous article, no physician in the cities of -Montreal and Quebec can become a druggist unless he ceases to practice as a physician and surgeon; but the present clause shall not apply to those physicians who are at present keeping druggist shops.

 

   c. Every drug store shall be carried on under the name of the bona fide protector thereof, who must be a licentiate of pharmacy or a duly registered physician d surgeon.

  A physician or licentiate of pharmacy, not being the bona fide proprietor of a drug bore, allowing his name to be used as being such proprietor, shall incur, for each :Offence, the penalty hereinafter provided ; and any person being the proprietor of a drug store, using or holding out to the public, contrary to the provisions of this law, the name of a licentiate of pharmacy or of a duly registered physician and surgeon, as being the proprietor thereof, shall incur for each offence, the penalty hereinafter provided, except in cases provided for by article 4032.

  4036. Notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary in this section, it shall be lawful for any licentiate of pharmacy to employ such certified clerks, or certified apprentices as he may deem necessary to assist him in the duties of pharmacist; but it shall be unlawful for any person to employ "any clerk or apprentice for any such purpose, unless such clerk or apprentice be registered in accordance with the provisions of this section. 48 V., c. 36, s. 21.

  4037. It shall be unlawful for any apprentice, or for any licentiate of pharmacy to permit any apprentice to engage in the dispensing of prescriptions, or in the sale of the poisons enumerated in Schedule A, unless such certified apprentice be under the immediate supervision of a physician or a licentiate of pharmacy, or certified clerk, during the time he is engaged in the dispensing of prescriptions, or in the sale of the aforesaid poisons.

  4038. It shall be unlawful for any person to keep open more than one drug store in this Province, unless each additional or branch store be under the direct control and management of a registered physician or a licentiate of pharmacy. 48 V., c. 36, s.23.

  4039. Nothing herein shall prevent the sale by persons not registered in pursuance of this law, of paris green or London purple, so long as said articles are sold in well-secured packages, distinctly labeled with the name of the article, the name and address of the seller, and marked "poison."

  4039a. For the purpose of this law, the proprietor on whose behalf any sale is made by any clerk, apprentice or any other employee, shall be deemed the seller, without prejudice, however, to the liability of the three classes of persons in pharmacy under article 4046.

SECTION 9.-Prosecutions and penalties.

  4040. Prosecutions instituted for the recovery of any fine imposed under this section may be instituted by the association or by any other person, before the judge of the sessions, the police magistrate or recorder, in the cities of Montreal and Quebec, or before a district magistrate or justice of the peace of the place where the offence was committed, in the other parts of the Province, or may be instituted, before any competent court of the place where the offence was committed, by simple civil action in the ordinary manner. 48 V., c. 36, s. 25.

  4041. In default of immediate payment of the fine and costs, they are levied by the seizure and sale of the movables of the defendant; and in default of sufficient property, the defendant shall be liable to be imprisoned in the common gaol of the district for a period not exceeding ninety days, unless such penalty and costs be sooner paid. 48 V., c. 36, s. 26.

  4042. In any prosecutions under articles 4035 and 4038, it shall be incumbent upon the defendant to prove that lie is entitled to exercise the calling of a licentiate of pharmacy, or to assume any of the titles specified in the said articles.

  The production of a certificate, showing that he is so entitled, shall be considered prima facie evidence that lie is so entitled. 48 V., c. 36, s. 27.

  4043. ]No person, otherwise competent to be a witness in any suit or prosecution in which the corporation may be, engaged, shall be deemed incompetent by reason of his being a member or officer of the said corporation. 48 V., c. 36, s. 28.

 

  4044. In any prosecution instituted under this section to recover any of the penalties thereby imposed, the offence may be proved by the oath of one witness. 48 V., e. 36, s. 29.

  4045. If any person shall falsely represent, by any name, title, or description, that he is registered under this section, or falsely represent the class or grade of his registration, or engage himself as a certified clerk, or as a certified apprentice, not being registered as such, he shall be liable to a fine for every such offence, of twenty dollars, together with costs. 48 V., c. 36, s. 30.

  4046. Any person offending against the provisions of articles 4032, 4035, 4035a, 4035h, 4035c, 4036, 4037, 4038, and 4039 shall incur a penalty of twenty-five dollars for the first offence, and of fifty dollars for the second and each subsequent offence, together with costs.

  4047. Every person who shall willfully or knowingly sell any article under the pretence that it is particular drug or medicine which it is not in fact, shall be subject to a fine of twenty-five dollars and costs. 48 V., c. 36, s. 32.

4048. Every person who neglects to furnish the information to the registrar required

. by article 4031 shall incur a penalty of five dollars, with costs. 48 V., c. 36, s. 33.

  4049. Every person selling the poisons mentioned in articles 4033 and 4034 otherwise than as therein provided shall be liable to a penalty of twenty-five dollars and costs. 48 V., c. 36, s. 34.

  4050. Every person refusing to submit the register kept in compliance with article 4034 for inspection by the registrar shall for each refusal incur a penalty often dollars and costs.

  4051. All fees, penalties, and fines payable under this section, shall belong to the Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of Quebec for the purposes of this section. 48 V., c. 36, s. 36.

SECTION 10.-Miscellaneous provisions.

  4052. Nothing in this act shall interfere with the privileges conferred upon physicians and surgeons by the various acts relating to the practice of medicine and surgery in this Province, or with the business of wholesale dealers in drugs, or with dealers in photographic supplies in the ordinary course of wholesale dealing, or with chemical manufacturers, or with duly licensed veterinary surgeons, in their practice or business as such.

  Schedules A and B, after article 4052 of the said revised statutes, are replaced by the following Schedule A, and Schedule C shall be known as Schedule B.

SCHEDULE A.

 

Acid Hydrocyanic (Prussic). Aconite and its preparations. Antimony, Tartrate of.

Arsenic and all compounds thereof. Belladona and its preparations. Calabar Beans.

Cantharides, and the Tinctures and Acetum thereof.

Carbolic Acid (pure and crude). Chloral Hydrate.

Chloroform and Ether. Chlorodyne.

Cocaine and its preparations.

Conium and its preparations.

Corrosive sublimate, and compounds

thereof.

Croton Chloral Hydrate. Croton Oil.

Cyanide of Potassium and all metalie cyanides.

 

Digitalis and its preparations.

Ergot and its preparations. Elaterium.

Essential Oil of Almonds. Euphorbium.

Hemp, Indian, and its preparations. Hyosciamus and its preparations. Mercurial salts and their compounds. Morphia and its salts and solutions. Nux Vomica.

Opium and its preparations, including

laudanum, but not paregoric.

Savin and its oil. St. Ignatius Bean.

Strychnine and all poisonous alkaloids

  and their salts. Veratria.

Verdigris.

 

 

GASPS BASIN.

  There are no wholesale or retail druggists in this consular district. Drugs are only used here by the doctors in their practice and they purchase them from the wholesale druggists of Montreal and Quebec. The stores here only handle the common patent medicines.

ALMAR F. DICKSON, Consul.

GASPS BASIN, February 21, 1898.

QUEBEC.

  So far as I can learn, "phenaticine," " sulphonal," a fir balsam," "syrup of red spruce gum," and "ursina" are the only articles exported to the United States. I can not give the value.

  Nearly all drugs and proprietary medicines in common use are imported more or less from the United States.

  I know of no American articles that are imitated or counterfeited in this city. Have heard that "Carter's Little Liver Pills" were counterfeited in Canada, but find none in this market. The laws prohibit counterfeiting proprietary articles.

  Most of the leading proprietary medicines of the United States are sold in department stores, also the leading perfumes and druggists' sundries; they do not ask the printed retail price.

FPM. W. HENRY, Consul.

QUEBEC, February 26, 1898.

SHERBROOKE.

  There are no drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' sundries exported from this province to the United States of any considerable extent.

  No American medicine preparations are imitated in this province. There are no laws here prohibiting such imitation.

  The trade in drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' sundries, etc., is confined mainly to drug stores, and these articles are not sold in other stores, except that in the rural districts patent medicines are allowed to be sold in country stores, and when so sold usual retail prices are required.

PAUL LANG, Consul.

SHERBROOKE, February 17, 1898.

THREE RIVERS.

  Castoreum and fir balsam have been exported in quite large quantities from this district to the United States. The export prices demanded for castoreum was from $9 to $12 per pound, and fir balsam $2.50 per gallon.

  The following patented medicines have been imported directly from the United States: Lorings's Fat-Ten-U-Food, Mamma Dura, Petrojel, Stuart's Dyspeptic Tablets, Ma-Le-Na-Pills, California Catarrh Cure, Dr. H. James's Extract Canabis Indica, Himalaya Kola, Walker's Vinegar Bitters. There is also a very large consumption of American drugs, chemicals, proprietary articles, perfumes, and druggists' sundries, which are bought from the large wholesale houses of either Montreal or Toronto. The only American medical preparation which I believe has been imitated to any extent is the Syrup of Figs. I know of no laws prohibiting such imitation.

  Patented medicines are sold in most every grocery store in this consular district, and the printed retail prices are generally undersold. Perfumes are also sold in most every dry goods store. There is a law to prevent any but licentiated druggists and physicians from selling patented or any other medicines, but in the case of patented medicines it has only been put in force against department stores.

THREE RIVERS, March 9, 1898.

URBAIN J. LEDOUX, Consul.